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EDIT Research

Kim Juree

January 11, 2018

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Hwigyeong – 揮景 series, Juree Kim (2011). soil and water.

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Place and Practices, Juree Kim, (2017).

Kim works primarily with clay, performance and film to explore the themes surrounding social and natural environments with a focus upon Korean cultural identity. Kim’s artistic work and research mirrors Brownsword’s concerns due to her observations on the destruction of regions within Eastern Seoul as a result off gentrification and the displacement of local communities and skills.

 

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Research

V&A Artists Residency – Opening the Cabinet, Histories of Slavery and Slave-Ownership

January 11, 2018

We are delighted to announce our new call for artists who are keen to engage with the histories of slavery and slave-ownership that are ‘hidden in plain sight’ within in the museum, as part of the V&A Research Institute (VARI) Opening the Cabinet of Curiosities project. The selected artist will be encouraged to engage with both the V&A’s collections and the information we are unearthing about them to make visible these histories not currently reflected in the museum.

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-Noted to keep an eye on for future information.

Research

Notes

January 11, 2018
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While watching technique videos I came across Kara Leigh Ceramics. She talks about how clay can become tired, which got me thinking about how clay is considered to have memory. My interests center around collective memory and how the voices of women are being silenced.

Could I look into working with “tired” clay as a means of representing the tired women? The overworked women? Forcing a function of clay to make it do what I want even if it doesn’t look good or actually function properly?

EDIT Research

Doris Salcedo

January 20, 2018

Doris Salcedo: Untitled (2008). Wood, metal and concrete. 78 x 247 x 121 cm. (White Cube)

For Salcedo, the tension arising from the clash of materials expresses the emotional and psychological unease at the heart of her work, which is motivated by the traumatic effects of civil war on the Columbian people. The use of particular materials to express this was inspired by the work of German artist Joseph Beuys (1921-86), which Salcedo discovered while she was studying art at New York University in the early 1980s (MFA 1984). Beuys’s notion of ‘social sculpture’ – integrating political awareness with making – and his focus on materials to convey specific meanings were a significant influence on her practice.

EDIT Research

Doris Salcedo

January 21, 2018

Doris Salcedo

Untitled (1998) Wood, cement and metal. 2140 x 1495 x 570 mm. (Tate)

Salcedo’s work gives form to pain, trauma, and loss, while creating space for individual and collective mourning. These themes stem from her own personal history. Members of her own family were among the many people who have disappeared in politically troubled Colombia. Much of her work deals with the fact that, while the death of a loved one can be mourned, their disappearance leaves an unbearable emptiness.

Untitled, 1998 is one of a large group of Untitled sculptures combining domestic wooden furniture with cement that Salcedo created during the 1990s. The first series was exhibited as a large group at the Carnegie International, 1995 in Pittsburgh before being dispersed. Tate’s work was part of an installation in Liverpool’s Anglican Cathedral during the first Liverpool Biennial in 1999. The sculptures, mainly comprising cupboards, chests, armoirs and wardrobes, alone or combined with chairs, bed frames, tables and other chests, resonate in a variety of ways. The level surfaces of the poured cement combined with more or less visible sections of steel armature have industrial associations allied with minimalist sculpture, which the blocking of space – either filling openings or creating actual blocks on and under chairs – enhances. These sculptures recall such works by British artist Rachel Whiteread (born 1963) as Untitled (Nine Tables), 1998 (T07984) and Untitled (Rooms), 2001 (T07938) in which empty space – the space under a table and the negative space of a room – appears solid. In contrast to the rough, heavy cement with its blank, impassive flat surfaces the wooden furniture in Salcedo’s work appears fragile and mortal. Made by craftsmen, by hand, the sculpture’s wardrobe and chair have a history of relationships with human bodies – those that made them and those for whom they were created. In relation to the cement, they stand in for bodies; although as their openings are closed they are bodies that can no longer function; they are sealed and silenced in a manner that powerfully evokes death and entombment. As well as uncomfortably fusing two or more pieces of furniture, Salcedo’s Untitled series often incorporates clothing into the layer of concrete filling the openings in the cupboards, drawers and cabinets suggesting even more poignantly the remains of people who are no longer alive.

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EDIT Research

Doris Salcedo

January 22, 2018

Salcedo grounds her art in intense research, which includes prolonged fieldwork and extensive interviews with those who have experienced violence and loss. Seeking out direct accounts, or obtaining physical evidence from victims or their relatives and friends, she becomes what she calls a ‘secondary witness’. To articulate catastrophe visually, she has consistently resorted to techniques of eradication, disfiguration, blockage and especially removal. The last of these offers a particularly effective way to represent trauma – not only because disaster literally annihilates people and things, but also because when attempts are made to recall it, there is often a failing of memory, since trauma has the effect of obliterating its own recollection.

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EDIT Research

The Jewish Museum & Garden of Exile // Daniel Libeskind

January 29, 2018

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Photography by Bonnie Fortune and Brett Bloom

Located in Berlin’s Jewish Museum, the Garden of Exile represents the experience of European Jewish exiles, driven from their home during World War II. Standing in between the rows of forty-nine concrete container columns is a claustrophobic, disorienting experience, where you are aware that logically, escape is very close but physically, you feel as if you are trapped forever. Source.

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Photograph by Bitter Bredt

“If you forget your memory, have a trauma and you repress it, it’s going to come to haunt you. It’s going to do something to you, something bad, something violent at some point. It’s important not to repress the trauma, it’s important to express it and sometimes the building is not something comforting,” he added. “Why should it be comforting? You know, we shouldn’t be comfortable in this world. I mean seeing what’s going around.”

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Photograph by Michele Nastasi

“In projects that deal with brutality architecture is not just an affirmation of what we already know,” Libeskind told Dezeen after the talk. “A shift to something unknown, even repressed, initially perhaps might be feeling like something strange or discomforting but in the long run its incorporated as part of our space, as part of understanding of the world.”

“The way to do it is by incorporating memory and not as a footnote but as a turbulent ground on which our world is based,” he added. “And it is turbulent when you look at the news and all that’s happening, all the events in this world, we can’t just pretend that we’re living in another era.”

Libeskind applied this concept to the Ground Zero masterplan (2003), which he designed to mark the spot where the twin towers of New York’s World Trade Centres once stood. While an invitation to visit the base of the well created by the terrorist attack was rejected by the other architects in the running for the project, Libeskind said his acceptance led to his decision to memorialise the 9/11 bombings at ground level.

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Concept Sketches for Ground Zero Master Plan by Studio Daniel Libeskind

He also cites meeting the fathers of a fireman and of a flight attendant who were killed in the attack as having a key role in the design process.

“They unrolled a piece of paper and they said

‘We have a map of all the body parts that were found.’

You don’t think about it, you don’t want to think about it.”

Source.

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WTC Overview by Joe Woolhead

Research

Books

January 29, 2018

To read:

Artwork as Social Model: A Manual of Questions and Propositions by Stephen Willats

Transient Spaces – Deutsche Guggenheim

The Image and the Witness: Trauma, Memory and Visual Culture by Guerin and Hallas

Unfolding the ‘Comfort Women’ Debates: Modernity, Violence, Women’s Voices by Maki Kimura

EDIT Research

Menashe Kadishman

January 30, 2018

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Photograph by Alex J Foster.

The architect Daniel Libeskind created empty spaces in several parts of the building [Jewish Museum]. These so-called voids extend vertically through the entire museum and represent the absence of Jews from German society. The Memory Void contains a work by the Israeli artist Menashe Kadishman, who calls his installation “Shalekhet,” or “Fallen Leaves.” He has dedicated the over ten-thousand faces covering the floor to all innocent victims of war and violence. (Source)

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Photography by Emilie Kristiansen.

This piece clearly relates to our not-so-distant history of WWII. It is easy to see the connection between the unidentifiable faces and those victims of internment camps. But Kadishman does not want us to limit our interpretation of this piece to the Holocaust. The work is meant to represent all who have died because of violence and war, the souls of yesteryear, today, and the future. This is one of those artworks that hits home hard. It forces you to take a moment to reevaluate the world we live in. (Source)

 

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Photographs by Hannah Busst

Research

Testimony

February 1, 2018

I had to service 30 to 40 soldiers every day. One day I was really in pain, and when I didn’t respond to the demands of one officer, that bastard beat me with his fists, kicked me with his boots, took a long knife and held it up against my throat and cut me.  The blood poured out and soaked my whole body, but that bastard officer went on to satisfy his lust.